Emotional Alienation State Act

Alienation litigation refers to the interference of outsiders in the marriage. The defendants in these lawsuits are usually the lovers of adulterous spouses, but family members, counselors, therapists, and religious members who encourage their spouses to divorce are also sued for these issues.

Emotional Alienation State Act

These claims are difficult to establish and involve many elements, such as proof of love, alienation and destruction, malicious behavior, etc. However, there is no need to show proof of extramarital sex.

Adultery is also considered a common law, called criminal conversation. This is an old way of expressing sexual intercourse, which is usually out of date. Similar to breach of promises, torts involve broken engagements, relationship estrangement, and spouse abandonment.

This common law tort has been abolished in multiple jurisdictions. In fact, only a few states in the United States still allow emotional transfer lawsuits. These states include Hawaii, Illinois, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Dakota, and Utah.

AL

The legislation aims to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit in many states including Alabama, California, Florida, and Idaho.

  • Alabama: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Alaska: Neither state law nor case law solves the problem of emotional transfer in Alaska.
  • Arizona: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Arkansas: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • California: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Colorado: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Connecticut: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Delaware: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • District of Columbia: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Florida: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Georgia: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Hawaii: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Idaho: No, the emotional transfer lawsuit was abolished by a judicial decision.
  • Illinois: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Indiana: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Iowa: No, the emotional transfer lawsuit was abolished by a judicial decision.
  • Kansas: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Kentucky: No, the emotional transfer lawsuit was abolished by a judicial decision.
  • Louisiana: In 1927, in Moulin v. Monteleone, 165 La. 169, 115 So. In 447, the empathy litigation was abolished.

MQ

In 2003, the Missouri Supreme Court abolished the state’s emotional transfer lawsuit. States like Mississippi, New Mexico, and North Carolina still allow emotional transfer lawsuits.

  • Maine: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Maryland: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Massachusetts: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Michigan: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Minnesota: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Mississippi: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Missouri: No, on June 17, 2003, the Missouri Supreme Court abolished the state’s emotional transfer law.
  • Montana: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Nebraska: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Nevada: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • New Hampshire: No. According to Chapter 460, Section 2 of Title XLIII, “In any transfer based on the feelings of the other spouse, no damage shall be caused to either party.”
  • New Jersey: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • New Mexico: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • New York: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • North Carolina: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit. Note: Since October 1, 2009, if a couple has an extramarital affair after separation, the alienation method cannot be used. NCGA.state.nc.us – HB 1110
  • North Dakota: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Ohio: No, in 1985, the general law c. abolished sentiment transfer litigation. Article 207. 47B, inserted by St. 1985, c. Section 74 1.
  • Oklahoma: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Oregon: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Pennsylvania: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.

Ritz

In 1997, the State of Texas enacted the Family Law, which abolished the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit. Judicial decisions in states such as South Carolina and Washington have also annulled litigation.

  • Rhode Island: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • South Carolina: No, the emotional transfer lawsuit was abolished by a judicial decision.
  • South Dakota: Yes, it is still possible to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Tennessee: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Texas: No, Chapter 1.107 of the Family Code was enacted in 1997 to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Utah: Yes, alienation lawsuits can still be filed.
  • Vermont: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Virginia: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Washington: No, the emotional transfer lawsuit was cancelled by a judicial decision.
  • West Virginia: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Wisconsin: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.
  • Wyoming: No, the legislation is to abolish the right to file an emotional transfer lawsuit.

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Emotional Alienation State Act
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