The Link Between Ocular Migraine and Stroke

One eye migraine is a headache that accompanies visual disturbance or loss and usually lasts less than an hour. These headaches usually stem from decreased blood flow or spasms of blood vessels in or behind the blood vessels. retina s eyes.

A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain stops due to a clot or bleeding. There are two types of strokes: ischemic a stroke (caused by a clot) that prevents blood from circulating in the brain, or hemorrhagic A stroke (caused by bleeding from a blood vessel) that puts pressure on surrounding brain tissue.

This article explains the link between ocular migraine and stroke, the signs and symptoms of each, and how to minimize your risk.

Eye Migraine Symptoms

There are two types of ocular migraine: retinal migraine and aura migraine.

One of the main differences is that retinal migraine usually affects only one eye, whereas migraine with aura affects both eyes. Symptoms of eye disturbance and vision loss usually occur within an hour of a headache attack or during a headache.

Symptoms of migraine with aura may include:

  • flash
  • blind spot
  • tingling in the hand or face
  • foggy view
  • Curved or twisted lines
  • partial vision loss, or dark spot
  • Small bright spots or the look through heat waves or water

Some people with migraine with aura may also experience problems with motor skills, speech difficulties, or other sensory difficulties.

Symptoms of retinal migraine can be more invasive and may include:

  • Vision loss or reduced impairment in one eye
  • see flashing lights
  • temporarily blind

It can be difficult to distinguish the cause or type of ocular migraine, so be sure to speak with your healthcare provider if you experience symptoms. In some cases, retinal migraines can cause irreversible vision loss.

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stroke symptoms

Stroke symptoms may come on suddenly and may include:

  • Numbness or weakness of the face or limbs (especially on one side)
  • Confusion and difficulty speaking
  • Can’t see clearly in one or both eyes
  • Difficulty walking, lack of coordination, or balance problems
  • Unexplained sudden severe headache

seek medical attention immediately

During a stroke, time is of the essence. If you think someone may have had a stroke, call 911 right away. The sooner a person receives medical care, the better their chances of survival and recovery.

How are they connected?

Some ocular migraine symptoms, such as vision loss or disturbance in one or both eyes, can be the same or very similar to stroke symptoms. Additionally, some people with migraine with aura may experience stroke-like symptoms, such as problems with motor skills, difficulty speaking, or other sensory difficulties.

Migraine with aura may also resemble transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as small stroke. A stroke headache can also resemble a migraine.

Without imaging diagnosis, it is difficult to determine the cause of many headache symptoms. On diagnostic imaging, some migraine patients have white matter changes similar to those in stroke patients.

migraine stroke

A migraine stroke occurs when a migraine with aura and an ischemic stroke occur at the same time. This type of stroke is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all strokes.

increased risk

Research has shown a link between migraine with aura and an increased risk of ischemic stroke. The exact reason for this link is unclear, but some researchers speculate that contributing factors may include:

  • Vascular, inflammatory or endothelium structure of the brain
  • Gender (migraine affects more women than men)
  • Oral contraceptive use
  • smokes
  • an inherited heart disease called Patent foramen ovale
  • Vasoconstrictor drugs used to treat migraines

In 2016, the American Heart Association reported a 25-year study showing that patients with migraine with aura were 2.4 times more likely to experience an ischemic stroke than those without migraines. In addition, migraine patients with aura were 3 times more likely to experience an ischemic stroke due to a mass or clot that originated in the heart and spread to the brain.

People with ocular migraines can manage two factors that may reduce their risk of stroke, including quitting smoking and stopping the use of oral contraceptives.

If you smoke, talk with your healthcare provider about ways to help you quit. If you take oral contraceptives and develop migraines, discuss alternatives with your healthcare provider.

treat

For the occasional ocular migraine, medication for migraine symptoms is a common approach. These may include:

  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibuprofen
  • anti-nausea medication

Preventive drug therapy can also help and may include:

  • calcium channel blockers
  • antiepileptic drugs
  • three rings drug

Other non-drug treatments and preventive measures include:

  • rest the eyes
  • lying in a dark room
  • relieve pressure
  • Keep away from harsh lights
  • Avoid staring at the computer screen for long periods of time

Talk to your healthcare provider or eye specialist about other ways to avoid migraine triggers.

How to Treat Migraines

generalize

Ocular migraines include migraine with aura and retinal migraines, affecting both or one eye, respectively. They may include eye disturbances and temporary vision loss. While there is a link between ocular migraines and stroke risk, research suggests the risk is relatively small.

Smokers and people taking oral contraceptives are at higher risk. If you smoke or use oral contraceptives, talk with your healthcare provider about methods that can help you quit smoking and other birth control options.

VigorTip words

Migraine headaches can be painful and debilitating, affecting a person’s daily life. Fortunately, with symptom management and rest, most ocular migraines are temporary. If you have ocular migraines and are concerned about your risk of stroke, talk with your healthcare provider about strategies and healthy lifestyle changes that may reduce your overall risk.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is a Threat Stroke?

    Stroke with aura occurs when migraine with aura and an ischemic stroke occur at the same time. It is also called a migraine stroke. This type of stroke is rare, accounting for only 0.8% of all strokes.

  • What is the difference between an ocular migraine and a stroke?

    Ocular migraine is a headache with visual disturbance or loss that usually lasts less than an hour. The cause of ocular migraines usually stems from decreased blood flow or vasospasm in or behind the retina of the eye. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain stops due to a clot or bleeding.

  • How common is stroke in people with a history of ocular migraine?

    Research has shown a link between migraine with aura and an increased risk of ischemic stroke. One study showed that patients with migraine with aura were 2.4 times more likely to experience an ischemic stroke than those without migraine with aura. In addition, migraine patients with aura were 3 times more likely to experience an ischemic stroke due to a mass or clot that originated in the heart and spread to the brain.